GL33_TIMG

 

There’s no set recipe for a successful sale. It’s just the nature of the beast, every person and every situation is different. Yet, there are several tried and true techniques you can use to have more effective and more profitable joint sales calls. If you want to learn how to run a joint sales call like a boss, then this is one Grow Live you won’t want to miss.

Join Matt Johnson and Natalie Lane as they share their tips for earning trust, creating relationships and developing proposals that solve your prospects’ biggest pain points.

Watch, listen or read now and learn more about:
  • Modern tips and strategies for successful sales calls
  • The journey from pre-call to post-call (and everything in between)
  • What the heck is the 2 legs, 2 ears and 1 mouth technique?
  • How to sell value and connect with your prospect’s primal need

“You’re not there to sell, you’re there to solve” — Matt Johnson, CMO & Managing Partner at Spinstak Growth Agency.

Check out these additional resources:


Today’s call to action: Do you have any tips on how to run a sales call like a boss? Let us know in the comments below. Show us some love by commenting, liking and sharing Grow Live and we’ll reward you with some Spinstak swag!

Give us a shout if you need help building sales processes for your company. We’re here to help! Just reach out for a free consultation at www.spinstak.com or call us at 866-270-0810.


Don’t miss next week’s show! Next week, we’ll follow up this episode with what Sales Enablement is, what it means for your company and how to use it to drive your sales team to the top!

Are you ready to grow?

Watch Grow Live on YouTube...

 

Listen to the Podcast...

Click here to listen to the audio-only version of the show on your favorite podcast app. 

 

Read the Grow Live transcript... 

Matt:

Today on Grow Live, we're going to talk about how to run a joint sales call with your manufacturer rep.

Natalie:

Do you have any tips on how to run a joint sales call like a boss? Put them in the comments below.

Matt:

Like a boss. Hey everybody, welcome to Grow Live. I'm your host, Matt Johnson. With me today is Natalie Lane.

Natalie:

Hello, how is everybody doing?

Matt:

Today we're going to talk about how to run a joint sales call like a boss. I'm excited about this episode, Natalie. This is where I can get to kind of nerd out on sales process, and what a great sales experience looks like, and this is a topic that you don't hear talked about very often, but this is the idea of a joint sales call today. So I'm excited about that, but before we jump in, I want to acknowledge that today is Natalie's birthday, and Natalie, happy birthday. Look what I got you.

Natalie:

Oh, well, thank you.

Matt:

This is a snazzy growth ninja t-shirt.

Natalie:

Nice.

Matt:

So, happy birthday.

Natalie:

Thank you. I can definitely relate. I love that.

Matt:

You are a growth ninja.

Natalie:

[inaudible 00:01:16]

Matt:

And for our listeners who are tuning in, guys, you too can own one of these awesome shirts, and all you have to do is engage in our content today on the show, let us know what you think about it, ask us a question, we'll be sure to answer it quickly, and ... Or share this show. There's lots of ways you can do that. We would love to see you engage with the show, we'd love for you to share it. If you do, you can be sure that we will hook you up. We will track you down and ask you for your address and send you some of this, or maybe some of this. Let us know.

Natalie:

Yeah. Just a quick shout out to Liz whose been engaging with our show. She's been a fan for a while. We've just sent her a little swag pack.

Matt:

Thanks Liz.

Natalie:

So thank you.

Matt:

Thanks for listening to the show. Speaking of which, you can get this show on several different formats. You can watch it here of course on Facebook live, we're here typically at 12:00 o'clock. We're running a little late today. It's the Spring forward time change. I'm gonna blame it on that. That's my story. But, you can also find us on YouTube, just type in Grow Live, we're at Spinstak TV. You can find us there. We also have a podcast, so we're on whatever podcast catcher you're using, iTunes, you can find us there. Just type in Grow Live as well. And then finally, if you want to go back, look at the show notes, find some valuable links, you can find that at our blog, and that's at spinstak.com.

 

So, that business out of the way, let's jump into our conversation today. I'm pumped about this. You know, industrial distributors cannot know everything there is to know about every type of product category and application. And so, they often times, in fact, most of the time rely heavily on their manufacturer sales reps to help them bridge the gap so they can bring in an expert to talk to their customers about very specific needs that may be having. So today is all about what that looks like, and whether you're a supplier or a manufacturer sales rep or you're a distributor sales rep. Or maybe you're on the marketing team and you support either of those types of people, this episode is for you.

 

So we're gonna talk about some really cool tips about how to run those sales calls and we're gonna start with some basic things today. You want to help us outline the conversation, Natalie? And I'll kind of be the subject matter expert, if you will today.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Matt:

Kind of ask me some questions and we'll have a good dialogue.

Natalie:

Yeah let’s start with the pre-call. Let's start about what happens before you go into the sales calls. So, lets cover the basics first. So, I would say that the top three things that we have to do are collect, coordinate, communicate. Why don't you expand on that a little bit?

Matt:

Yeah. When we say collect, coordinate, communicate, it's sort of like the three pillars you have to cover before you ever have the actual sales call. And really this can be done whether you are the supplier or the distributor. It really depends on who is owning the account and who's bringing the account to the other person. For example, let's say that you're the distributor, and you have a customer that you have identified a need with. What you want to do is, do your homework first. Take good notes and provide some details about this customer so that you can bring your manufacturer rep up to speed.

 

This is where I think a good CRM can be extremely helpful. A tool to allow you to capture those notes, go back over maybe previous orders, figure out what their ordering, what their buying from you if they're an existing customer. If they're not an existing customer, what kind of conversations have you already had that have helped you identify some needs with that prospect. I like the idea of creating a very simple executive summary that I can share with my joint sales teammate on this call. This would give them some basic information about who the decision makers are, any key contacts that are at the location that you're gonna be visiting, some information about how that company operates maybe. Who do you need to get approval from in order to get an order for example?

 

Also, some common sales qualification framework is always important. We like to use BANT: Budget, Authority, Needs and Timeline. That's a common thing that sales people use. There's other ways of qualifying. But making sure that you have that information first and foremost before you ever schedule the call, because obviously if it's not qualified you wouldn't even have that call.

Natalie:

Right. So this piece is more managed a traditional sales process, right?

Matt:

Yeah.

Natalie:

What steps do you think would be more tailored towards the manufacturer distributor relationship?

Matt:

Well it's because you are working with a partner, it's important that you have some information that you can coordinate with them and this is where it's important to do your homework. You can't just expect to meet up in the parking lot prior to going into your customer's location, give them a quick rundown and then be okay. I mean, I've seen people do it, it's not recommended. This is why we're saying, making sure, cause it's two of you guys and you have to be on the same level, or gals. You need to make sure that you guys are set up to do the work and to be on the same page.

 

The next thing, Natalie, is to coordinate. And this is just good housekeeping, I guess, right? This is just doing the work of, you know, making sure that you've planned far enough in advance. Getting the meeting the on the calendar, sending out an invite so that everybody understands when you're meeting. Going over where you're going to meet. That sort of thing. And also creating an agenda so that your customer prospect knows exactly what to expect from a joint sales call.

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

So they may have on joint sales calls before, but if they haven't, just kind of preparing them for what's happening. Tell 'em hey I'm bringing in my distributor, or I'm bringing in my manufacturer rep, and we're going to have a conversation, and they know about this subject and this is what we're gonna talk about.

Natalie:

Awesome. And then the next step I guess would be to coordinate all of that information with everyone at all of the locations. So, the person that you are partnering with and then also with your prospect, right?

Matt:

Yes. Kind of like a triangle.

Natalie:

Triangle. Yeah.

Matt:

Triangle of communication. Exactly right.

Natalie:

Awesome.

Matt:

So communicating. We talked about collecting the information, coordinating the actual call and then communication. Now this is where a lot of type A super star sales people, they really, if we're honest, they suck at this because they're all about improvisation, they're all about kind of moving on the fly. So they're not doing very much of this pre-call work. And this is a discipline for sure. I like to have a pre-call meeting set up. So, before our initial meeting where we're gonna meet with the actual customer on site, on location, I like to have at least an hour long call with my manufacturer sales rep or my distributor sales rep. I want to go over the information that I've been collection, go over the coordination of the event itself and make sure that we're on the same page so that we can go in there and work as a seamless team.

Natalie:

Yeah. That makes a lot of sense actually.

Matt:

Yeah. We gotta know who is doing what. Who's gonna introduce. Who's going to be doing the introductions? Who's gonna be asking the questions? Who's going to be offering solutions and we don't want to stumble over each other.

Natalie:

Yeah. Absolutely. That makes a lot of sense.

Matt:

Kind of like when we get on the show, we have a meeting before we have our show so we understand you're asking questions, I'm answering the questions, right?

Natalie:

Yeah. Absolutely. So, I guess the next process is going to be actually getting on the call. You come on location, so tell me about the strategy of two legs, two ears and one mouth because I think that's pretty interesting and I think it resonates really well with ...

Matt:

Two legs ...

Natalie:

Yes.

Matt:

Two ears. Only one mouth. This is my outline for you guys to remember. Two legs, two ears, you have one mouth. Two legs. What I mean by that is you have to get out onto the floor. This is important because a lot of times your customer may try to keep you in their office or in a production office or you know, a site office or a meeting room, and that's okay. Maybe. But you're only going to be able to do so much from there.

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

It's like calling a doctor and talking to the doctor over the phone as opposed to going into his office and letting him examine you. So there's only so much you can do. We want to make sure that we get out on our two legs onto the plant floor, onto the work site, on location so that you can identify your opportunities. Especially with a joint sales call, Natalie, it's very important because you're bringing a manufacturer sales rep for example, these are the big guns.

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

They know about the areas that you're gonna go look at. They understand regulations better than you do. They understand solutions better than you do. And that's where we want to get them out in the field so that they can do their thing.

Natalie:

Right. So you get the full experience. It's like you guys are really being introduced and engulfed into their world, if you will.

Matt:

Yes.

Natalie:

Makes sense.

Matt:

So that's important because the next thing is using your two ears to listen carefully, right? This is the idea of, and I know that any good salesman out there knows this, you have to listen first before you can identify areas where you can be helpful. Remember this, and you gotta repeat after me guys, you're not there to sell, you're there to solve. So, if we take the approach of solving problems, and you are a consultant, you're the doctor of signage and identification, you're the doctor of gloves, you're the doctor of power tools. You need to come in there and listen carefully to your customer. Figure out where their pain points are and then once you understand what some of the issues are that they're facing, you might be actually able to speak to them intelligently.

 

Often times, this means asking good questions and this is something that is definitely learned over time. But I do have one little trick to use if you are working with somebody, a customer or prospect whose on the quiet side, more reserved. Maybe a little reluctant to share information about what's happening inside their operations. I like to use a little technique called give and take. So, basically what I'll do is I'll ask them, hey I noticed that you are a manufacturing facility, and I've worked a lot with these kind of facilities just like yours. I noticed that you have lots of different gloves around. Many companies that I've worked with experience frustration in carrying so many types of gloves. This might be an opportunity for some cost savings. Is that something that you're experiencing? Giving them some information, either a story about how you've helped out another customer, giving them information about regulations or industry news and events, and then following it up immediately with a question.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Matt:

This is how you can get them talking because you're basically the one, you're taking the first step, you're initiating some trust. You're saying, hey I want to tell you about something you may find interesting. And then asking them a question will open them up and they'll feel more able to share at that point.

Natalie:

Sure. It's more relatable I would say, and definitely puts you guys on the same page in terms of thinking about the same pain points, I guess, that they might have.

Matt:

Yeah. I will just say, too, if you're a distributor, and this is your customer, you know them a thousand times better than your manufacturer sales rep is gonna know them.

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

So this might be an opportunity, if they're a little quiet, and they're shut down, use the background information that you already have about that customer to open up opportunities of conversations so that your manufacturer sales rep can in there and do their thing and provide that expert level advice.

Natalie:

Yeah. And would you say that this sales process is probably way more consultative than most?

Matt:

Oh this is extremely consultative. This is not an order taking opportunity.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Matt:

In fact, and I'll get to this in a minute at the end, but, you may even at the end of this identify that this manufacturer is not the right fit for this customer. Hopefully you've already qualified that beforehand, but I think you have to take the approach that I'm gonna figure out as much as I can about you, and then if I can help you, I will. But I don't know that for sure. That's what this walk through is about.

Natalie:

Right. That makes sense.

Matt:

Okay so the next thing is one mouth. One mouth. If you know me, you might think I have three mouths. But I try to do a good job of listening and then once I know you, and I know your situation, that's when I can unleash the power. And a lot of sales people out there, they just can't wait to give the sales pitch, and they can't wait to offer the value that they know they have. And they're confident in their company or their product, but you have to wait. And you have to wait until you're off the job site, off the floor. Even if you know it's a juicy morsel opportunity and you're just like oh I know I can help you, let me tell you all about it. Hold your horses, partner. Wait 'til you get back to the office and then let's wow them with your solution.

Natalie:

Right. Yeah. And I think in most sales situations and scenarios, the best thing to do is wait until everyone is done speaking on the topic, and then come out and really provide that solution at the end with the kicker, right? You don't wanna offer a solution or pitch too early because it could be the wrong time, and then you may be proposing the wrong solution.

Matt:

No doubt. And it's gonna have more of an impact, too.

Natalie:

Right. Sure.

Matt:

Once it comes later after you've earned their trust by listening well and asking good questions. Sometimes you need to acknowledge, like I just said, that you may not be the right fit. This is difficult, you know. This requires a ton of discipline. But you may have to understand, okay, for example, you're the manufacturer, and you know that you're the high price-high quality option in a good-better-best scenario, you're the best product. But maybe the customer is looking for the type of product that you offer, but maybe they're looking for the low cost solution. Maybe they're looking for the throw away solution.

Natalie:

Right. And I've seen that a lot. Right?

Matt:

Yeah.

Natalie:

Especially in this industry. So tell us a little bit more about that. How do you overcome that?

Matt:

Frankly, I would say, I would be very honest with them. I think this is where transparency wins. This can win for you, if you're not selling yourself to just win every deal. You have to acknowledge, listen looks like what you're looking for Mr. Customer is the throw away option, I wouldn't say throw away. You're looking for the low cost, economical option, but let me tell you about my company. My company offers the high quality option. Our value is in long term relationships. Our value is in cost savings over time. So that might be how you approach it, and then you say, it doesn't see like we're the right fit.

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

And if you're honest, that builds additional trust. Big time trust with the customer.

Natalie:

Sure. Maybe even some equity. Right?

Matt:

Oh yeah.

Natalie:

And maybe a future relationship down the road that lasts for a longer time.

Matt:

Exactly. And that's what I would say. If you're a sales rep, you gotta think long term as well. Don't just think about what kind of sale I can get today, but think about what that might mean two years from now when that guy realizes the low cost, economical solution is not working out very well. Oh yeah, I remember that one guy, he didn't want to sell me the low cost solution, that's who I'm going to go to.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Matt:

Then the last tip here for on-site, this is by the way, you know have listened, you've walked through the building, you understand the opportunity. Now you're blowing their mind with your value proposition and your sales pitch. Always conclude your sales pitch with a connection from your product to the customer's most primal needs. This requires a little bit of study. This is why you have to listen carefully when you're on the floor. Listen to not just what their problem is, but what drives them. What motivates them?

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

Okay. So, for example, if a customer is really interested in cost savings, they're interested in lowering the cost of the equipment in their facility, maybe they're into getting that acceptance that human acceptance, that approval from their higher ups or management. You may say that your solution will help them make an impact to the company's bottom line, and help them look like a rock star. That is appealing to their primal, basic, Maslow's hierarchy of needs, right?

Natalie:

Sure. Yeah.

Matt:

That would be the last thing I would do. And then kind of following up with a strong connection with your distributor partner or vice versa. Remember to tell them, listen, when you're working with my distributor, you're working with a network of experts like myself who can help you solve these problems. And we're here to help you do that. Communicating the value of each other. Having each other's back in this situation goes a really long way and it can often be a winning formula for these companies.

Natalie:

Awesome. I have two questions. Actually one question, and then I want to move on to the post-call. How long are sales cycles like this typically? How long do they typically last? If you're going in and trying to propose a solution on a partner call, what does that look like? What is that timing?

Matt:

It just depends, Natalie. If it's a big deal, let's say it's an integrated solutions deal, if your distributor, maybe you are setting yourself up inside of a large business or large organization, and you're gonna be their supplier of choice, that deal could take nine, ten even a year. Ten months to a year to get that done. That might mean frequent visits on site. That might mean bringing in multiple manufacturer reps to work over and kind of create a holistic view of how you're gonna supply your customer.

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

On the other hand, if you're maybe a smaller distributor and you're working with an existing account, those can go very quickly. That might just be a matter of distributor coming into a customer, hey Mr. Customer we love you, you love us, we have a good relationship, you buy all of your safety equipment from us, today I'm bringing in my sign guy and my sign guy knows a lot about your signage needs. You've expressed to me that you have some issues with signage, you need to replace them, here's my sign guy. He goes through, does a walkthrough of your facility, identifies those signs that you need, puts them on a spreadsheet. Everybody goes that's awesome thank you for getting that information, when can I see the quote. The sign guy gets the quote, the distributor delivers the proposal and that can be closed in a couple days or a week.

Natalie:

Wow.

Matt:

So it can be quick if it's like an existing customer and it's something that you're doing kind of just to service them. Or it can be an arduous, long marathon if it's a new account and you're trying to break in or maybe replace an existing distributor.

Natalie:

Yeah. So integrated solutions or enterprise level, expect 12-18 months. And then there's some that are much faster, so you really have to analyze this to see how you approach a sales call, right?

Matt:

Exactly. And then going back to the beginning, the pre-call.

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

Making sure that you both understand what's happening here.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Matt:

Is this an existing account where we're gonna go in, and I expect to have a quote in a few days, and I expect to get the order, the prices on target. That's different than saying hey I'm working on a relationship with this prospect. They're not doing anything with us yet. Or they're doing a little with us, and we're trying to take them to the next level. These are different scenarios for your sales guys and this is why you need to have that clear communication up front.

Natalie:

Right and a plan in place for each one. Sure.

Matt:

Exactly.

Natalie:

The post-call I would say is something that I'm pretty passionate about, just in talking about sales because I think this applies globally across sales, right?

Matt:

It does. Yeah.

Natalie:

I remember, you know, back in the day, used to be between nine and twelve touches before you could get somebody's attention post a sales call regardless of what kind of sales call it is. Now days, it's probably between 20-30 touches before you actually grab their attention post a sales call, depending on what .... Right? Just depending on what the cycle is?

Matt:

Yeah.

Natalie:

Tell me a little bit about that. About the follow up, and then what's the appropriate way to send a proposal in this type of scenario?

Matt:

I'll do a follow up and then creating a proposal, and then making sure that we follow through. For the follow up portion, it's important to follow up immediately.

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

And this is where taking good notes while you're there on site is important. Even if it's just, this is not easy to do, I'll admit. Having a pad of paper or your tablet or something and just writing one word there to just remind you, jog your memory. Then coming back and creating an email in response to the sales call that you were just on, that highlights the top things that you guys discussed, so it's sort of like bringing everybody, you know, memory. Once your sales call is over, it's back to the day to day grind for your customer, so they may forget some of the things that you talked about.

Natalie:

Sure.

Matt:

So highlighting those things that you talked about is important. And then after you do that, we'll want to make sure that we highlight any action items that came out of the call. For example, I will provide a quote, or Johnny with XYZ Manufacturing will create a quote and send it to me, and I'll get that to you as soon as possible, or whatever. Making sure that everybody knows what the action items are, the timeline for those and when there's going to be a next follow up.

Natalie:

So I would say, you know, just to go back to what I was talking about in terms of the touch points and the number of touch points. If you do a better job on the front end, you're not going to have to struggle so much on the back end post call.

Matt:

Always. It's always that way. The discipline of preparation and doing things right in the beginning creates a better product in the end.

Natalie:

Sure. Absolutely.

Matt:

It has to do with relationships as well. I would say in addition to following up and making sure that there's clear communication post sales call, we'll want to, when it is time, maybe that's directly after the call or maybe it's requires a little more negotiation, a few more touches, but when you get to the point of creating a proposal, this is where I'm kind of passionate about. This is where the marketing kind of design nerd in me gets really feisty. I really disdain Word document and Excel file proposals and quotes. I think that we could do a lot better in this regard. Because I think what we do when we create Excel files with prices on the products and we just send that over to the customer, it's really a bad disconnection between the experience that they had if you're a good sales person.

Natalie:

Daunting.

Matt:

And it's just, it leave a dry taste in the mouth of the customer. It doesn't make them excited about purchasing.

Natalie:

Right. You're not selling on value at that point, right?

Matt:

No. I don't think so. I personally like to see proposals that have images in them of the products that you're proposing to sell with clear pricing. And also some information about your company, information about your value proposition in there so that if your customer does need to forward this proposal to their management, or to the buying agent in this case, they have that information about who you are. Maybe there's some testimonials in there, maybe there's some additional trust building content besides just a blank spreadsheet. Could have came from anybody, you know. Let's show that we're a professional organization here and have some logos on there and some color. That's what I like to see. And there's so many great proposal software out there that the sky's the limit. You can go get the stuff for like $40 a month and there's great templates already pre-built. You just have to add the content and if you need help with that, I might know a guy who can provide you with industrial content.

Natalie:

That's awesome. Very cool.

Matt:

Last thing ...

Natalie:

The follow through.

Matt:

The follow through.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Matt:

What do you think I mean by this?

Natalie:

I'm not exactly sure, but I do want to see that it's about post close, right?

Matt:

Yeah. This is where you gotta get a little bit aggressive.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Matt:

And a little bit tenacious. And a little bit persistent. Because when you deliver a proposal or a quote, most of the time, like you just said, it takes over a dozen touches to get you to close that.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Matt:

And most sales people don't have the discipline or the endurance to see it all the way through. This is where I find some of the modern CRM tools and email tools and project management tools can be a life saver. So, scheduling a follow-up sequence or rhythm afterwards, where I say I'm gonna follow up with a phone call, and then I'll do an email, and then I'll message them on LinkedIn, and then I'll send another email, and then I'll send another phone call. Having a rhythm to your follow-up is really important, and having it in a place where it's scheduled and it bings you or dings you when it's time to do that is important as well. Because you will forget.

Natalie:

Yeah. But it works.

Matt:

Yeah when it's ...

Natalie:

It works. It works.

Matt:

When you're like a week or two in after you sent the proposal, you're on to other things. You get dinged in an email that says follow-up with John about the quote that you sent, it keeps you on track.

Natalie:

Yeah. Absolutely.

Matt:

Okay. We made it.

Natalie:

Yeah. What type of communication do you think is best in this industry? Do you think it's best to do your follow through via email mostly or do you think that there should be a combination of phone calls and emails? And I know everybody is a little different, but specifically for this industry?

Matt:

I believe you have to do both. I think that what is most effective for me, that I've seen, is that you have to send, you want to call first.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Matt:

So I always start with a call. Most the time, you're not getting through. And if you do get through, they probably haven't had time to read it, and that's usually the answer you get. I know it's sitting in my inbox, I haven't read it yet. Do a little tough love with them and say, okay, great, no problem, I know you haven't read it yet. When do you think you'll get around to reading it? Can I call back in a couple days after you have had time? Sure, no problem. Give me a couple days and call back and then we'll talk about it. Right?

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

And then make a note in your CRM or your black book or whatever the heck you're using to track this stuff, to call back in two days. And then I would call back in two days, if you can't get ahold of them, leaving a voice mail. And then if you can't get ahold of them and you leave a voice mail, always follow up with an email saying hey I just left you a voice mail, just following up on that quote that I sent you. It's that kind to persistent phone, voice mail, email and then sometimes, if you really want to get somebody's attention, you send them a message on LinkedIn or Twitter and that might get their attention as well.

Natalie:

Awesome. Sounds good. Pretty thorough.

Matt:

It's very thorough. And usually you don't have to, it's not always this hard either. Sometimes a sales call just goes like butter, right?

Natalie:

Right.

Matt:

You have to have, you have to be prepared in the case where you have to work a little harder. And that's what separates, I think, the really great sales people from just the average.

Natalie:

Awesome. I think so, too. I would agree with that. Very cool.

Matt:

Alright guys. Well that's it for today. We're gonna wrap this thing up. Hey, if you guys have any tips in addition to what we talked about today, we'd love for you to leave those in the comments either on Facebook or YouTube. We would really encourage that dialogue. We want to talk about this. This is something that is important, especially if you are out there on the day to day grinding. Love to see what you think about this message and definitely would love to learn alongside you, as well. Certainly don't have it all figured out. Would love to see your tips help me become a better sales person.

Natalie:

Join us next week; we're going to talk about sales enablement. We actually offer a service for that, but we're gonna tell you what it is, how it can help your team and your organization grow and build your legacy. So join us next week on Grow Live and we'll see you then.

Matt:

Thanks guys.

Natalie:

Thanks.

 

Hey everybody thanks for joining us. If you're just getting started with us on Grow Live, be sure to check out some of our favorite episodes in the show notes.

Matt:

And don't forget that you can see us live on Facebook every Wednesday at noon. Or you can find us on YouTube and binge past episodes in full HD.

Natalie:

If you found this helpful and you want to see more, leave us a review and we'll enter you for a chance to win some Grow Live swag. Thanks again, everybody.


New Call-to-action

Topics: Grow Live, digital marketing, resources, industrial marketing, marketing tips, marketing tools, traditional marketing, sales professional, Sales

Comments: