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You won’t want to miss this week’s exciting episode of Grow Live. It’s an invasion of the swine persuasion. Dave White and Fred Radunzel (or is he Bacon??) join Matt Johnson and Renia Carsillo to talk safety and how the industry is changing.

Watch, listen or read now and learn more about:

  • Why you need to look below the surface when it comes to safety
  • How buying the right PPE can make you more profitable
  • When you just have to ditch your fear and try something new
  • How digital marketing has expanded their reach
  • How to successfully work with an outside agency

We go through a plethora of safety information and squeeze the good stuff out,” — Dave White, Co-owner of Quad City Safety

The safety industry is changing. To see how it’s changing and why, go ahead and visit Quad City Safety Inc. and subscribe to the Dave & Bacon Safety Tales podcast! You won’t hear safety quite like this from anywhere else.


Make sure to keep on the lookout for a special edition Dave & Bacon Safety Tales recorded right here in the Safety Marketing Services studio!

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Listen to the Podcast...

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Read the Grow Live transcript...

Renia:

Hey, welcome back to Grow Live everybody. I am Renia, director of digital strategy at Safety Marketing Services and I'm back again with Matt, our CMO and managing partner. Hi, Matt.

Matt:

Welcome back guys. Glad to have you with us.

Renia:

And you might notice we have some special guests again this week. If you were with us last week, you may know who they are. We have Dave and Fred from Quad City Safety joining us today and we are very excited to have them. And do we have Bacon? Is he hiding under the table?

Matt:

Where the hell is Bacon?

Renia:

Where's Bacon?

Matt:

Where'd he go?

Dave:

We left him at home.

Matt:

Oh, he's into more trouble.

Fred:

He's in a suitcase getting sliced up.

Renia:

So Dave and Bacon ... Dave and Fred.

Fred:

It begins. That's how it begins.

Matt:

Are you Bacon, Fred? Is that how this works?

Fred:

I don't think I'm Bacon, but I can fit a persona of Bacon. I'm not as portly as my friend over here.

Dave:

No, I would be more of the hog.

Renia:

So Dave and Fred, besides being a kick ass team behind Quad City Safety, they are also the host and co-host of Dave and Bacon Safety Tales, which is a new safety podcast. I think we're in, what, episode six now? Five? Six?

Misty:

Four.

Fred:

Four.

Dave:

Four, five, six.

Renia:

Misty says, "Four" from the audience.

Matt:

They've done six but we're in four of being published.

Dave:

We're in season one.

Renia:

We're in season one, there we go. We're in season one of Dave and Bacon's Safety Tales, which is a great resource for you to see what's happening inside the safety industry. You can click below this video in the description to go and subscribe to Dave and Bacon's Safety Tales, because at the end of our live show today we're gonna go offline and have a little discussion that you're not gonna wanna miss, that will show up on their podcast feed. But enough about that, we'll about it a little bit later just to remind you.

 

Let's kick it off with, Dave you wanna tell us a little bit about how the hell you ended up on a live show?

Dave:

I got an invitation by email.

Fred:

He got on an airplane.

Dave:

And got on an airplane, and then got a rental car, and went to a motel, and then finished a 20 minute drive this morning, and entered the building.

Fred:

You weren't even planning on driving, but my driver's license I found out was expired when I got to the rental car place.

Dave:

How you got through TSA on the way in, I have no idea.

Renia:

How did you get through ...

Fred:

It just expired a few days ago. My 35th birthday is November 29th.

Dave:

Shows you how crappy TSA is.

Renia:

You know this is a live show, right. So you might have problems getting back the other way.

Fred:

Come and get me. I got three or four other aliases I can go by. It's no problem.

Dave:

We got a UPS number we can ...

Matt:

Bacon being one of them?

Fred:

Yeah, Bacon Redunzle. That's what they call me.

Renia:

I'm thinking flying from the Midwest to Florida, or Florida to the Midwest is not usually an alarming trigger. It probably happens a lot around these parts.

Dave:

I would guess. This time of year we're getting there.

Fred:

I voluntarily took my shoes off. I was good to go.

Dave:

I'm pre-check. I don't have to do that anymore.

Renia:

Nice, I like it.

Fred:

Status.

Renia:

I need to get me one of those.

Dave:

You should. It's well worth whatever hundred dollars, and just proclaiming you're not a terrorist or whatever, and getting on with life. It's pretty cool.

Fred:

Nice.

Renia:

You guys wanna tell us, what's the deal with Bacon anyway? Where'd he come from?

Dave:

Bacon is a pig.

Renia:

I get that he's a pig.

Dave:

And so, it's been kind of a joke for years that when you talk about ... Obviously, pigs are from the Midwest, we're Midwesterners, so it kind of plays into it. Then when you look at bacon, bacon can be money and we're after a TCO approach to safety. So, TCO's not just the cheapest stuff, it's a principle based look at what we supply, how we supply, and how we train to where hopefully if we're not cutting off hands, and fingers, and killing people, a deaths only $1.5 million, so you can buy a lot aids and earplugs, and $5 gloves with that. So, kind of going after the saving bacon.

 

And followed by when you think of a pig and you think about breakfast, it's one that goes back a lot of years as the egg is part of the process, the pig is really committed to the process ‘cause it has to die.

Matt:

Of making breakfast.

Dave:

Yes.

Fred:

Super committed.

Matt:

Yeah, the chicken contributes, but the pig is all out.

Dave:

He's dead on.

Fred:

Pot belly committed.

Matt:

And TCO means total cost of ownership?

Dave:

Correct. A lot of people ... Imagine costs, so when you talk about cost in our industry is everybody always wants to pay attention to the top of the iceberg. When we look at an iceberg, we really know through everybody that's been through fifth grade science knows that the largest part of the ice berg is below the water. Unfortunately, everybody always concentrates on what I can see and they don't look to the cost below as, if we hurt somebody, what does that do to our work comp's premium? What does it do in lost time? What does it do in productivity? Cause we have to shut the plant does because somebody lost a finger. It can be fines, penalties, whether it's OSHA or another governing body that slaps something down. So, paying attention to the fact that everything is just not okay. I have a standard. I gotta meet the standard and it costs me this.

 

I'll often refer back to National Safety Council did a white paper that looked historically over a lot of different industries over a period of time and went for a calculation of, do you make money providing safety? And they really went back in there and they said, for every $1, there's $2.50 worth of value that's produced under that $1 that you put in, so doing that paradigm shift will make you more profitable. Unfortunately, as we all know I should be on a diet and I'm not and so I need to shift my paradigm.

Matt:

Yeah, me too.

Dave:

But thank God, the first is coming up. I'll renew that gym membership and do all that good stuff. So shifting those paradigms can be a hard thing.

Matt:

Yeah, so Bacon represents this idea of total commitment to safety and it's a holistic view of safety, right? It's not just, oh wait you need to meet the minimum requirements, so here's a glove that does it, but it's looking at it from a bigger perspective. And that's why Bacon's a great mascot for you, right?

Dave:

Yep, it's worked well.

Matt:

Not many safety distributors have mascots though, right?

Dave:

Well, we're not everybody.

Matt:

Right.

Renia:

That brings up a great point, because you guys are really good at taking a very serious thing, you're dealing with people's lives and making it playful.

Dave:

Safety, part of the reason that people shy away from it is, it is boring and everybody wants to walk round chatting about standards, "1910 dot, 1926 dot." And the problem is those people that are preaching that to people, the person that's receiving the message is literally like they turn off. They have no idea what it means. It's nerd stuff. They don't wanna pay attention to it.

Fred:

Or they're afraid of it.

Dave:

Or they're afraid of it because they don't understand it, ‘cause they talk in big words and acronyms, and all this stuff that means nothing to nobody. We're trying to take an approach that we make it a little bit of fun, direct and to the point. It's something that needs 30 seconds to convey the message, should take 30 seconds.

Fred:

Yeah, I gotta tell you that I'd crapped pants then, if that's gonna get the point across, then that's the route we'll go if we have to.

Dave:

Absolutely.

Renia:

Love it.

Matt:

Yeah, go check out their latest episode to learn about crap and the "oh shit" factor. That was a great episode. Enjoyed that a lot.

Renia:

Right on, thank you.

Matt:

Found out that you were a soft kind of guy.

Renia:

Yeah.

Dave:

Hey man, I mean it comes up.

Matt:

No more spoilers. You gotta go check that out. That was a hilarious episode. Yeah, I was just gonna piggyback on that Renia, if you don't mind? But this idea of differentiating yourselves from your competition, because this is a marketing podcast, right?

Dave:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Matt:

So we talk a lot about how do you go to market and how do you set yourself apart from all of the other partners, their supply and safety equipment, right? You talk about having this brand and the Bacon the pig. What is the mentality behind that in terms of trying things that are a little more out of the box?

Dave:

Well, when you sit there and you start clicking around the internet, you can quickly google safety suppliers and it's gonna bring up a group of people. You're gonna look at the first page and the second page, and they are all going to look very similar. So, you have to do some wild different shit to get people to pay attention to you, to stand out, to not appear to just be, yeah we put the same gloves and shit in a box and ship it to somebody. We wanna be more and we wanna be better than that.

Matt:

Right on.

Fred:

We didn't even ask, is swearing acceptable on this show?

Matt:

It is. We'll have to put the little "e" on it, so producers ... Actually, it think it would be hilarious if you could beep this stuff out in the produced version, so maybe we can ask them to do that.

Fred:

You put a little black box and a question mark, exclamation point over his mouth.

Renia:

It's either that or mark it explicit, iTunes gets really uptight about that.

Fred:

I figure. You can't take this guy anywhere.

Matt:

It's all good.

Renia:

I love it.

Matt:

We love him being himself. That kind of plays into that question too like being yourself and not trying to pretend you're somebody else. You’re not trying to be an Amazon. You're not trying to be a Walmart. You're not trying to be a one size fits all safety distributor. You are who you are, and you are going to be proud of that, and that's how you lead. That's how you go to market. In fact-

Fred:

We're not looking to lose.

Dave:

No, that's kind of-

Fred:

If we try to-

Dave:

As long as we're paying taxes, we know that we're doing something okay.

Fred:

Right.

Renia:

I think there's a lot of fear around doing something that's enough to get attention. I don't feel like you seem to always have as much fear. Do you think you don't have any or do you just overcome it?

Dave:

I have to overcome it. I talk to Fred about this all the time and he sometimes talks me off the ledge. It's a comfort level and part of it is you know it's the right thing to do, so you do it. I try to never look back at anything that we've done. It's just do it, know that you did a good enough job on it, and go to the next thing.

Fred:

And try not to care what haters are gonna say. If you're trying to do something different-

Dave:

The world if full of opinionated assholes that all want to just ... I'm sorry I did it again. But the worlds full of those people that want-

Matt:

Player haters.

Dave:

They just can't get any good out of anything, which is okay. The worlds needs to hear some negative stuff sometimes, but it's easier to listen to that one person than the five people that said, "That's okay. It's good." It's a lot easier to go, "No, I'm not gonna do it because OA."

Matt:

Some of the best brands in the world when you think about some of the most successful companies out there, the way they go to market is very polarizing at times. They are literally saying, "If you are about this, then you're not a good fit for us." And they're very clear about that. If you're looking for the best price, and you're looking for next day shipping, and if that's what you care about in terms of a buying experience, we're probably not it for you guys. But if you're looking for unbelievable customer service, and hand holding you through the buying process, and helping you stay up to date with the best standards, and best practices in terms of doing your job, that's where you guys come in and that's where you add that value.

Dave:

If we're doing our job, we would appear to be part of somebody's safety committee. To somebody on the outside looking in that doesn't know what's going on, it would appear that we're some level of a consultant, which we are. It's just that we're paid for our consultation services through the purchase of the product.

Matt:

Right, awesome.

Renia:

You are not an order taker.

Dave:

If we are, we die.

Renia:

Right.

Dave:

Because Amazon has proven that they can kick the crap out of everybody in putting two or three items in a box, placing tape on it, and then surrendering to a common care.

Renia:

Yeah, love it.

Matt:

That's great to know that I'm not crazy, because I've been preaching this message for the last year and a half, and my man Dave here just backed me up. So, you guys heard it here that Dave agrees with everything I said.

Fred:

I don't know necessarily that Dave agreeing with you proves that you're not crazy, but that's one way I guess to look at it.

Renia:

I like my grandmother's way of coming about this. When I was a kid getting picked on, she'd be like, "Oh honey, if nobody hates you, nobody loves you either. Because if you want to create passion in people, that means there are some people that are not going to like you." So that's just kind of the way it is, right?

Dave:

My father, one of the things he always instilled us with is conflict was the beginning of creation.

Renia:

I like that.

Dave:

So, if you don't have a little bit of conflict, you're not gonna create. And who wants to live in a mundane square world? Not I, said the fat guy.

Renia:

I like to tell clients that are taking risks ... And I don't know I've never said this to you out loud, but I've said it to your marketing manager, that if you haven't gotten hate mail yet, you're not succeeding. So I start to see, okay you're succeeding, you're getting the traction you need to get, you're doing what you need to do when you get that first hate mail because-

Matt:

Goals for 2018.

Renia:

... you need someone to tell you, you're wrong-

Fred:

Talk to the trolls.

Renia:

Yeah, but if you don't have any trolls, it's because you're not getting any attention. If you are getting attention in the digital world, you will have trolls.

Dave:

I don't need to know about them though.

Matt:

Just can you handle the trolls?

Fred:

I'll handle the trolls.

Renia:

Awesome, so you guys are obviously investing pretty heavily in the digital space. Can you tell us a little bit about what that's looked like for you and why you think that's important?

Dave:

It comes in the form of an invoice.

Matt:

From our accountant.

Dave:

Go ahead, I'm sorry.

Renia:

No, that was it.

Matt:

Why did you do that?

Renia:

Why'd you do that?

Dave:

Because the world's a changing, whether anybody believes it or not is when you look at where we're at today, and where we're headed, and the rates of change, the ball that we're headed to is way out there. I forget the law that states the amount of knowledge that's out there and that it doubles every so many years and that continues to speed up.

 

Also, what's speeding up behind that is computing power, automation, and if we don't get ourselves ready to change now ... If I look back and I go, when we started I knew that we needed to start. I had no clue what the hell we needed to do, but now we're 18 months into the process. The person that didn't do it is 18 months physically times two behind me, because we've done that lap, so we're spinning faster than they haven't even started rolling. So from a crawl, walk, run, we're in a medium paced walk and hopefully we hit stride at some point in time.

Renia:

That's I think one of the reasons why you do something like a podcast, right? Because there's so much noise in certain spaces that if you were a little late to getting started in a certain space, it's harder and harder and harder to stand out. But if you jump into some of those spaces that are a little newer-

Dave:

We're trying to sell to somebody that is not us. Meaning whether we call them millennials, whatever we want to tag them as. I don't think that's as important as they're different than us.

Fred:

Than you.

Dave:

Than me.

Renia:

I was gonna say, the rest of us are in that group.

Matt:

You're the only old guy here, Dave.

Dave:

I'm not that old.

Fred:

You're old, but at least you're still carrying some of your hair.

Renia:

Do you classify yourself as an Xer?

Dave:

What's that?

Renia:

Would you classify yourself as-

Dave:

Yeah, I'm an Xer.

Renia:

Okay, so Xer's according to the latest data we have, are actually the heaviest internet users.

Matt:

Hm, wow. That's surprising.

Renia:

Not millennials.

Matt:

Everybody would say millennials.

Renia:

Xer's are the heaviest internet users.

Matt:

But I think-

Dave:

Does that include like GameCube and PlayStation?

Fred:

Dude, GameCube?

Renia:

What is a GameCube?

Fred:

Nintendo GameCube came out, I stood in line at Walmart for a GameCube at like 20 years old, 15 years ago and got Madden and a GameCube at Walmart at two in the morning.

Matt:

You're only 20 years behind the times.

Renia:

I don't know what a GameCube is.

Matt:

That's what he's trying to tell you.

Dave:

What's an Xbox?

Fred:

So when we had Atari-

Dave:

Xbox One X-ish?

Fred:

Don't even know.

Renia:

Listen, I loved my Super Nintendo. I'm the same age as you and I loved that thing. That's called growing up poor.

Fred:

Yeah, I was a Genesis guy.

Dave:

No, I mean this was a video game when I was a kid. You had a joystick that you were driving and you were firing with that button.

Renia:

Pong?

Dave:

Whatever it was.

Matt:

I thought you were doing Morse code or something.

Dave:

You could.

Matt:

I don't think the microphone liked that. Leif, are you getting some feedback over there?

Dave:

Sorry about that, Leif.

Matt:

We talked about this earlier like it's this idea of when you look out there on LinkedIn and Facebook and stuff, if you guys are following in the same areas that we were at, it's like everybody's writing these blog posts about the same topics. Then at a certain time of the year it's all about heat stress and now everybody's talking about the Silica Standard. So, it's like these clumps of people all doing the same exact thing, right? But you guys are over here being like, "Yeah, we've been writing blogs for a while. We're doing a podcast now."

Fred:

Yeah, trying to present the information a little bit different way.

Dave:

How people want to hear it. That's changing and it continues to change.

Matt:

Some people don't want to sit there and read a 15 minute blog article, right? Some people like to jump in the car on their way to work or on the way to the job site, they plug in the podcast, and they just listen to you guys ramble.

Dave:

But part of what our job to do is to take this plethora of information, and squeeze the goodness out of it, and then serve that instead of having somebody ... I mean that's why we exist. That's why we exist in the channel.

Fred:

In this podcast, we're trying to get the information to people that will listen to a podcast. In some cases, we might need to educate them on how to listen to a podcast, but we've definitely got feedback back from different people that have said, "Oh this is really great, but I think it would be better if it was three or four minutes." It's like, well that's not what this piece of content is for.

Matt:

Right, it's not for you.

Fred:

It's not for you. Sometimes they're not really haters, they just don't really know why are we doing this and we have to be okay with this piece that we're creating is not for everybody. If somebody doesn't like-

Renia:

They’re not me with 100 podcasts on my phone.

Fred:

Yeah, I have probably 10 that I listen to that are a couple hours a piece, but the same person might not like that Dave swears a little bit or that we tell a story that's not safety related. That's okay. That piece is just not for you. We'll create something else that's for you and you guys can absorb that content.

Dave:

And as we get feedback, the goal is to morph it into how to say ... We've thrown it out there, people will tell us what they want and maybe they don't want it. We'll figure that out.

Matt:

And that's okay, we'll just adapt and we'll keep ... That's the thing about digital marketing is as soon as you think you've got this thing figured out, just wait around for another six months and it'll change on you. And so, constantly being able to pivot, and turn, and adjust, but also staying true to your convictions. You're convinced that this hypothesis is gonna work out like we think this podcast is going to be an effective way to reach this type of safety manager, this type of safety persona, then we gotta play it all the way out.

Fred:

Or person interested in safety. They might even be in college right now and that this is some way they can use to supplement, not necessarily their education, but maybe partially part of their education. They can learn a little bit how people-

Matt:

It's edu-tainment.

Fred:

... how people are talking on the job in the real world. You come out of college and you have a walk of standards like I learned this, this, and this, but I don't know how the people are actually using it that are doing these jobs. I think we can provide a little bit of insight into how our customers are using it and what our experiences are to be able to, I don't know, make that a relevant piece of content for them.

Renia:

Absolutely. And we live in a binge world too, so Netflix is a perfect example of this. They'll release a ton of content at once. So, if new people are finding you, if you only start a podcast when people come to you and are like, "Okay, I want a podcast" and you only have one episode for them to listen to, that's not super exciting. You kind of have to start before people are begging you for it, so that you have that backlog of content.

Fred:

Get them to really crave that Bacon.

Renia:

Bacon is pretty crave-able.

Dave:

Season seven of Longmire was pretty good though.

Renia:

I haven't watched it yet, so don't tell me.

Fred:

No spoilers.

Renia:

No spoilers. So Fred, I do wanna ask you, because I know we deal with a lot of marketing people that are struggling to get their sales team onboard and you are a sales rep at Quad City. You do a little bit of marketing stuff with Dave too, but you were real fast to get onboard with this and be like, "Yeah, we gotta do this stuff." Can you tell us a little bit about your perspective and what made you get onboard with Dave?

Fred:

In regards to podcast or in regards to digital marketing?

Renia:

Just digital in general, whatever.

Fred:

It's something I saw as necessary. I think I talked to Dave, we're pushing two or three years ago. One thing that came out of his mouth was, "The online game we're not gonna win. We're not gonna be able to be competitive with that." And at that time in my head I was thinking, "Well, this is definitely the way that things are going. This is happening."

Matt:

So we're just giving up, Dave?

Fred:

Whether you like it or not and so in my head I'm like, "We're gonna lose this. I'm not gonna be here long. My career is not gonna go further working for this place that they don't see it as important." Then when he started getting a little bit of an interest in it and I started seeing some of the content that he was creating, I was like, "Now this is interesting to me."

 

So, that really helped me engage in it and I was like now that you're going down this road, I wanna be a part of it and I wanna help give you a different perspective, bring some things that I would like to see happen, these are the things how I absorb content, and how I'm bringing in things that there's not a lot of people that worked for our company that take in information the way that I do or the way that people younger than I do. I just really saw it as an opportunity to get involved, help the team out, and really start bringing our company into the next set of 10 years or whatever. I'm drawing blanks, decade. Into the next decade.

Matt:

That's awesome. I think that's a great example of ... I mean you are a great example, a living example of the new buyers journey and how things have changed. Because you come in and you're like, "Well this is the way that I go about researching the issues and figuring out what kind of products I need to buy as a consumer." You go and you look at the company you're working for and you're like, "There's big gap here." Then you're like, "Well, maybe we should be doing things like this because this is the way people my age actually research issues and come to conclusions about things."

 

Fast forward a couple years later, now you guys have a very robust online presence in terms of digital content, and educational content, and awareness pieces that can lead a buyer down that journey, kind of hand hold them if you will. I think what you guys are doing here is you're combining the best of both worlds. As a safety distributor, a specialist, what you are known for is that hand holding, consultative nature of sales, right? What you've done is you've mirrored that, or at least begun to mirror that on the digital side. And in bringing those two things together creates this amazing user experience, which ultimately should lead to brand loyalty.

Dave:

Yeah, but creating awareness is underdone. Meaning people know what they know, they know what they don't know, but they don't know what they don't know.

Fred:

They know what they know. They know what they know.

Renia:

And what you don't know can kill you, probably will. I think that's something you guys have been really good at Quad City in the last couple of years of understanding is what the role of this is when you're starting out, which is the role is awareness to start with. You're trying to make people aware of the problem. You're trying to actually help people. You're trying to provide solutions that work and that services ammo for you, but it also helps you build a platform, whereas you're not just going out and like, "Here's a glove for you to buy this week."

Dave:

Yeah, if we make them aware, we educate them, then hopefully they reward us through a sale, or they don't.

Matt:

But if not, you've done the right thing.

Dave:

We've done the right thing, yeah.

Matt:

Awesome.

Renia:

Awesome. So, I think it's pretty interesting what you guys have been able to accomplish. And I love you saying that, Fred, because I just want to emphasize what he said about, "I'm looking at this and thinking maybe I don't have a future here because there was a digital presence missing." And if you're looking at your sales team and your sales team is in their 50's or 60's and you're looking at maybe they'll need to hire some new people coming into ... You're gonna get that from a younger person especially a hungry salesperson.

Matt:

Take them to the pasture.

Renia:

If they're any good, they want to be set up to win, right?

Fred:

Right.

Renia:

And if you don't have those tools available for them, how do they win, right? So, I think Dave's doing a really great job there of setting up not just for today, but for the future too. I know you've heard us say a lot that digital isn't coming it's here, but there is a lot of future coming too with your new sales force that is really important.

Dave:

And you have to start somewhere, doesn't matter just start somewhere.

Renia:

Have you done everything perfectly since the moment you've started?

Dave:

My life has been a comedy of errors.

Renia:

So you start, you try things, you pivot, right?

Fred:

That question was not on the agenda. I don't think he was expecting it.

Dave:

Well, I mean you look to go to Amazon. They do a real good job of figuring out, "Well, we tried to do that. That didn't work. Shoot it in the head." Gen 2 comes up, they shot Gen 2 in the head, Gen 3. So not everything works, but it's the ability to ... You gotta say the serenity prayer a little bit every now and then, and then get on with life.

Fred:

Yeah, acknowledge it. What was I thinking? Alright, I can completely abort that. Just because I've put so much time into it doesn't necessarily mean that it's good and worth putting more time into.

Dave:

Well, that's part of the human condition is you get emotionally invested in something and then it's like, I gotta drag this towards the finish line when you should just go, no let's just pick a different race to run.

Renia:

I want you guys if you're feeling a little intimidated to google the Wayback Machine and put in any of your big websites, Amazon, Facebook, whatever it is and just look at where they started, because it's often hilarious and very educational.

Matt:

But the thing is that they started and to Dave's point earlier, he's been doing this 18 months, 2 years, whatever, and so many guys have not started and you're way behind now. You can start now and you could be way ahead of your other competitor, so time is a wasting as they say, right?

Dave:

Yeah, but it's that magical ... It's like when you look at compounding interest, it eventually gets out there to this thing and all of a sudden I'm rich.

Matt:

Rich in SEO. Rich in leads.

Dave:

But that's what it takes is, it takes that time commitment to get to that pinpoint where you go, okay it's getting ready to pop.

Renia:

So Dave, I wanna ask you one last question before we wrap up the live portion. Learning to work together, we've been working together for about 18 months and there's been a lot of back and forth between working with an agency like SMS and you as the company owner. What do you see as some of the pitfalls that maybe people should look to avoid or some of the strengths that maybe they should look to lean into when you're building a relationship with an agency?

Dave:

Well, you just have to work towards, obviously trust, but make sure that you over communicate what you want and what you expect. You know me, I'm verbally honest. If I don't like something, it's gonna come out of my mouth sooner than later as I don't think that's where we need to go, but then to have somebody that feels comfortable enough to go, "No, no, no, no. You shut up because that's really where we need to go" and somehow we figure it out together. Because if it was as easy as a 'check the box' map or something like that, you would be able to buy it on the internet for $12.99 and everybody would have a great digital presence and everything would be great, but that's not how or a good way.

Matt:

I really feel like it's this relationship that has to blossom over time and in the beginning we were like, "Yeah, I think we're on the same page. We could get married here." But then into the marriage you're like, "What the hell did I do? Did I just really sign up for this thing?" And there's some communication errors, it's much like a marriage relationship I often tell people.

 

But now we're heading off into year two together doing this big digital marketing initiative and I feel like just talking with you guys today that we are starting to really get on the same page, and we're understanding each other’s strengths, and we're understanding the business better. I feel like more today than ever ... I'm not gonna put words in your mouth, but we feel like more of an internal marketing team than we did when we first began, because we're starting to really understand your business better.

Fred:

Also, we're figuring out how to communicate it better. Sometimes it's who's your audience? Figuring out, how do they talk? I came into the team because Dave was having trouble communicating to you guys and understanding what you were communicating to him, and I was able to be like, "I can speak Dave a little bit, and I can speak what you guys are saying a little bit."

Matt:

You're a great translator.

Fred:

I can try and help bridge that gap, so it could even be finding someone on your team or hiring someone on your team that can help you do this because you might not have the skill set to completely be able to do it yourself.

Matt:

That's a great point.

Dave:

There is language gaps sometimes.

Matt:

Communication, that's the key of all relationships is breaking that communication down and spending time to show up and talk about it. I love what you said about having the brutal honesty to say, "That's bs guys. I don't like what we did there. That didn't work" and on the flip side to be able to take it as well because ultimately-

Dave:

Conflict is the beginning of creation.

Matt:

There you go. That's right and that's how you tell a good story. I really appreciate the story we've been telling together and really, really grateful for you guys coming and being on our show today.

Dave:

Thank you, Bacon.

Fred:

Absolutely.

Matt:

Yeah. Thanks, Bacon, appreciate it.

Fred:

No problem.

Matt:

What are we having for lunch?

Dave:

Bacon. Pork rinds.

Renia:

I really appreciate everyone being here today and I just want to say normally we give a call out to action that's really tactile, but I feel kind of moved to give you a little bit different call to action, our little bit different apply it today. I normally  tell you to make a marketing calendar or test some Facebook ads. Instead in your apply it today I'm really gonna say, look at your marketing plan for 2018 and ask yourself, are you being courageous in some way? Is it there to serve? Is it interesting?

 

Because if you can't answer a resounding, heck yeah, to the question you're probably not going to make anyone else excited either. If you look at it and it feels stale, if you look at it and it feels dry, you're not gonna make anyone else excited either. One of the things that Dave and Fred have had tremendous success at doing, is making people care about this really important topic of safety and keeping our workers safe. So, look at your plan and ask yourself, does it kick ass? And what should they do-

Matt:

Well, this week’s call to action is very simple and so I want to give you guys a tangible example of what we're talking about in terms of stepping outside of the box, getting into the blue water where there's not a lot of Amazon knife fights as Dave describes it, getting into that blue water.

 

Here's an example I want you guys to go visit Quadcitysafety.com and subscribe to their podcast and listen to this thing. I think you guys will love it. It's a very fun, different form of a safety podcast. There's not a lot of safety podcasts out there anyway, but this one definitely stands out from the clutter. So, go check that out, visit the website, see how these guys are doing it and I think that you'll be pleasantly surprised.

Renia:

Yeah, and we're actually going to continue this conversation for a little bit. We're gonna talk about creating safety at scale and you can find that information on Dave and Bacon's Safety Tales. So, you'll have to go there to get it.

Matt:

Only available on the podcast.

Renia:

Have a great week everybody. We'll see you next week for some pre-Christmas talk.

Matt:

Thanks for coming guys. We'll see you next time.

Dave:

Deuces.

 

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Topics: Grow Live, digital marketing, resources, Inbound Marketing, content marketing

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